KINDRED AT HOME - BRADENTON

HHA

Per Diem

kindredhealthcare.com

April, 2018


BROOKDALE - SARASOTA
CNA's/Caregivers
No experience necessary
brookdale.com
April, 2018


LIFECARE HEALTH PARTNERS - SARASOTA
Interviewing every Tuesday until March 27th from 10:00 am - 2:00 pm.
CNA - Full-Time
lifecarejobboard.com

April, 2018

Please contact all employers directly for any additional information!!


DOCTORS HOSPITAL - SARASOTA
CNA
Full-Time
doctorsofsarasota.com
April, 2018


BROOKDALE - PALMER RANCH
Resident Caregiver/CNA
Part-Time & Full-Time
brookdale.com

April, 2018

CASA MORA REHAB - BRADENTON

CNA's

All Shifts

casamorarehabilitationandextendedcare.com

April, 2018

8 Mistakes To Avoid During A Job Interview!


We all know the first-date-like jitters that go with a job interview: the more excited you are for the opportunity, the more anxiety you might experience before showing up. But as you prepare to meet your potential new boss and some potential new co-workers, it’s also important to remember what face you’re presenting to human resources. It’s their job to look out for indicators that you’re not the right candidate for the gig, and performing at your tip-top shape is essential to success. And often, human resources workers don’t have the sentimental attachments or industry networks that managers might have, so they’re harder to impress.

Gazing eye-to-eye helps the HR manager know that you see eye-to-eye.

Or are they?

“HR managers want to see that you’re confident in yourself, your skills, and your suitability for the company and role. If you don’t believe you can do the job and fit in with the company, why should the HR manager believe it?” asks business psychologist, career coach and content director, Kate Sullivan. “So presenting yourself with a calm, confident demeanor is important, even if you’re nervous as heck about the interview.”  

Avoid these red flags so you will definitely get asked back for round two. Here are the surprising ways you may be hurting your own chances. 

1. You don’t make eye contact

When you’re looking to hire a babysitter for your beloved babe or even a dog walker for your furry companion, would you select someone who didn’t look you in the eye?

It seems like a no-brainer, but when you throw in a helping of nerves, you might forget to maintain eye contact during an interview. Gazing eye-to-eye helps the HR manager know that you see eye-to-eye and that you’re presenting yourself sincerely.

“If you look away instead of looking directly at the interviewer, this indicates that you are uncomfortable with the question and/or that you may not be truthful with your response,” explains Amy Cooper Hakim, an expert on workplaces and industrial-organizational psychology. 

When you’re tempted to dart your attention because you’re doubting your response (or worrying if you’re talking too long), slow down, breathe and keep looking straight ahead. This will illustrate your strength and maturity, instead of making you look fishy.

2. You aren’t confident

Sullivan says that while you don’t need to be a world-class public speaker, a successful professional does have the ability to pitch themselves effectively. Here’s the thing: if you aren’t able to sell yourself to your dream company, who is going to do it for you? No one. “If you can’t, the odds that you’ll be able to close a sale or make an important business presentation aren’t good…and that’s not the kind of person most HR managers want to hire,” Sullivan says.

Though you don’t want to sound like you’re reading off a script, consider practicing your personal elevator pitch: who are you? Why are you awesome? Why should you, above anyone else, get this job?

3. You’re overly enthusiastic


Some folks clam up when their nerves get the best of them, while others become chatty and overcompensate. If your response to anxiety-laced experiences is to overcompensate with laughter, jokes and loud remarks, Hakim says to tone it down.

“If you are overly excited throughout the whole interview, then the interviewer may think that you are not being sincere or that you are putting on a show,” she notes. “Overcome this by smiling, yet not doing so in an exaggerated fashion. Show your enthusiasm for the position while still being professional.”

4. You dodge the tricky questions

You can probably detail your past work experience without skipping a beat. Or, when asked your advice on a topic that you happen to have a plethora of experience with, you might be able to speak smartly and directly. But what about your greatest weakness? What your besties would say about you? Your biggest mistake on the job? There’s a reason curveball questions are thrown into the job interview process, and your ability to answer them —without fumbling— illustrates a lot about your character.

“Adaptability is important because every job comes with challenges; how will you respond when there’s a monkey wrench thrown into your project plans?,” Sullivan says. “HR managers often try to ask quirky or seemingly random questions to see how well you can think on your feet and how you respond to the unexpected as a way to gauge what you might do in a high-pressure situation on the job.”

5. You don’t ask any questions

In any career book you’ll ever read, it’ll note how important it is to come armed with questions to an interview. And though you probably had a handful when you were trying to land that first gig post-college, now that you’ve been interviewing for years, you might forget this mandatory step. Don’t. Every job is different, and if you show no curiosity, it suggests you’re not paying attention. 

“If you do not have any questions for the interviewer about the position, the company, or as a follow-up to questions asked, then the interviewer may think that you are not taking the interview seriously,” Hakim says. “Overcome this by writing down two questions before the interview. Pull them out to read at the end of the interview, if you realize that you have yet to ask any on your own.”

6. You’re not showing your personality

A big part of job performance isn’t set upon strategic goals, big praise or even compensation. Instead, much of what contributes to an employee’s success and productivity is how happy they are at work, day-in and day-out. And though Sullivan says ‘culture’ might feel like a corporate buzzword these days, it’s still important and relevant.

“If everyone on the team is loud and boisterous, playing foosball after work and taking team trips to the skate park, a shy wallflower might not perform well, even if they have all the skills needed to do the job,” she explains. “Likewise, a quiet, studious team might not be the best environment for a high-energy person who thrives on constant excitement. Assessing culture fit can help both a team and an individual thrive.”

That’s why you have to be true to who you are and show your personality— not only to ensure that you’re a right fit for the company, but to determine if the company is a right fit for you.

“If you know that the company has a startup vibe with plenty of laid-back perks, you might be tempted to present yourself differently to show that you’d fit in. If you’re not the type to hang out on a climbing wall on your lunch break, don’t say that you are—admit that you’d rather take a walk or, you know, just eat lunch. It does no one any favors for you to insist that a dog-friendly environment is just what you’ve always been looking for when, in fact, you’re allergic to dogs,” Sullivan says.

7. You’re fidgeting

We all have ways we demonstrate we’re nervous, intentionally and unintentionally. A few ticks here and there are fine, but if you’re overly fidgeting during your interview, the HR manager is going to notice—and fast.

“Cross your legs or ankles to keep from tapping your toes or jiggling your leg. Don’t cross your arms—it can seem standoffish—but try squeezing your elbows to your sides or focusing on keeping your shoulders down and back,” Sullivan says. “If you really can’t help but fidget, try to do it subtly. Take out a notebook and pen as though you’re going to take notes during the interview—even if you’re not—so that you can squeeze the pen instead of tapping your fingers.”

8. You’re too rehearsed

Problem: you want to sound like you know your stuff. Bigger problem: you practice so much that you sound like a robot. HR managers want to get to know you, not the version of yourself that you think they want to hear. Buzzwords are fine and all, but without a personality and a human to go behind them, they just sound mindless and insincere. The human brain is wired for narratives. Learn how to tell your story. 

“Contrary to what you might think, jargon doesn’t make you sound authoritative—it makes you sound like you read a few too many articles on the latest hot topic in your field. It adds nothing to the conversation to tell the interviewer that you ‘10-X’d results and maximized synergies between stakeholders,’” Sullivan says. “If you really can’t come up with an answer to the question, say so. By having the confidence to admit that you don’t know something off the top of your head, then suggesting a solution, you prove that you’re flexible and that you’re comfortable enough with yourself and your skills to admit when you don’t know something.”

 Lindsay Tigar is a seasoned lifestyle and travel writer. When she's not busy writing, she's collecting another passport stamp, taking a boxing class or trying new foods. A full collection of her work can be found at lindsaytigar.com.

 



LAKEWOOD RANCH MEDICAL CENTER - LWR
CNA MED-SURG PRN
Full-Time
lakewoodranchmedicalcenter.com

April, 2018

HEALTH TRUST WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS - BRADENTON

CNA

Contract & Per Diem

healthtrustjobs.com

April, 2018

​CNA JOB OPENINGS AVAILABLE


INTELYCARE - SARASOTA
CNA
Full-Time
intelycare.com/apply

April, 2018


BROOKDALE - PALMER RANCH
Resident Aides & CNA's
Part-Time & Full-Time
brookdale.com

April, 2018


HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE - SARASOTA
CNA's/HHA's
Full-time & Part-Time
homeinstead.com/729/home-care-jobs

April, 2018


COMFORCARE HOME CARE - SARASOTA
Caregivers, CNA's, HHA's
No experience required
comforcare.com

April, 2018


RIGHT AT HOME - SARASOTA
Caregivers/HHA's/CNA's
Immediate hire if qualified
rightathome.net

April, 2018

Link to Florida cna skills center on facebook

HOMEWATCH CAREGIVERS - SARASOTA

Companion/Personal Assistant/CNA/HHA

Customize your schedule

homewatchcaregivers.com

April, 2018

Certain interview questions don’t set up all job candidates for the same chances of success.

Here some of the things recruiters should stop asking applicants if they want to level the playing field.

“Tell me about a time when . . .”

Framing a question in this way may give certain interviewees a leg up — but others may slip through the cracks because they don’t have much to share.

Adam Grant points out why “behavioral questions” like “tell me about a time when . . .” are problematic in an August 2017 post on “Wondering,” a monthly feature in Granted. He argues that they’re biased toward people with “richer” work experience.

Grant writes about the pitfalls in a post:

(a) They’re unfair—they give an advantage to candidates with richer experience. Ask a bunch of applicants how they handled a serious conflict with a colleague, and odds are you’ll get a better answer from the one who happened to face the biggest conflict.

He also goes on to add that these questions don’t pertain to a candidate’s current position or company, are about what happened “in the past,” not what’s ahead, and that “they’re too easy to game.”

Instead, citing research, Grant recommends posing “situational questions,” such as “what would you do if…” because interviewers can predict the person’s “best performance” and evaluate their “leadership and interpersonal skills.”

“What is the most interesting technology product on the market today?”

Natalie Johnson features this question as an example of bias in a HuffPostarticle. She argues that assessing the answer “can be highly subjective,” even though it’s used to gauge if applicants know about their field.

Here’s one of the questions Johnson suggests asking instead in order to assess the responses objectively and to see how much the applicant understands and is involved in their line of work:

Tell me about a new innovation/new piece of research/new technology you’ve recently learned about and/or have started using. How did you hear about it? How has it affected your work?

“What is your biggest weakness?”

Asking a question about weakness isn’t always the strongest tactic when face-to-face with candidates.

Alison Green writes about this question in an article for U.S. News & World Report, mentioning that it is “a cliché at this point” since almost all applicants have a “canned” response.

She adds:

It rarely elicits useful information, and what’s more, a good interviewer will be able to make her own judgments about a candidate’s weakness. It’s hardly helpful to hear “I work too much,” “I’m a perfectionist,” or the other disingenuous responses candidates are taught to give.

Off-limits: illegal interview questions

Keep in mind that just because you can technically ask someone something, it doesn’t necessarily mean you should.

It’s worth pointing out that it’s reportedly illegal to ask applicants certain questions — including ones about religious holidays — during an interview.

Asking about salary history has also made headlines recently. Employers in New York are losing their ability to ask candidates about their salary history with a law that goes into effect this October, and more than 20 states are deliberating enacting similar legislation, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Try these tips instead

Instead, here are some tips on asking effective questions during interviews, according to the Harvard Business Review.

The article suggests steering clear of questions that are “easy-to-practice,” citing the classic examples of “what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?” and “what’s your dream job?” alongside other queries.

It also says to see how well candidates can “solve a problem,” and to “avoid duplication” by not picking questions about things that were detailed in a phone interview or their resume.[Share on Facebook] Facebook [Share on Twitter] Twitter [Share on Pinterest] Pinterest [Share on LinkedIn] LinkedIn [Share via email] Email
LIKE US ON FACEBOOKCertain interview questions don’t set up all job candidates for the same chances of success.

Here some of the things recruiters should stop asking applicants if they want to level the playing field.

“Tell me about a time when . . .”

Framing a question in this way may give certain interviewees a leg up — but others may slip through the cracks because they don’t have much to share.

Adam Grant points out why “behavioral questions” like “tell me about a time when . . .” are problematic in an August 2017 post on “Wondering,” a monthly feature in Granted. He argues that they’re biased toward people with “richer” work experience.

Grant writes about the pitfalls in a post:

(a) They’re unfair—they give an advantage to candidates with richer experience. Ask a bunch of applicants how they handled a serious conflict with a colleague, and odds are you’ll get a better answer from the one who happened to face the biggest conflict.

He also goes on to add that these questions don’t pertain to a candidate’s current position or company, are about what happened “in the past,” not what’s ahead, and that “they’re too easy to game.”

Instead, citing research, Grant recommends posing “situational questions,” such as “what would you do if…” because interviewers can predict the person’s “best performance” and evaluate their “leadership and interpersonal skills.”

“What is the most interesting technology product on the market today?”

Natalie Johnson features this question as an example of bias in a HuffPostarticle. She argues that assessing the answer “can be highly subjective,” even though it’s used to gauge if applicants know about their field.

Here’s one of the questions Johnson suggests asking instead in order to assess the responses objectively and to see how much the applicant understands and is involved in their line of work:

Tell me about a new innovation/new piece of research/new technology you’ve recently learned about and/or have started using. How did you hear about it? How has it affected your work?

“What is your biggest weakness?”

Asking a question about weakness isn’t always the strongest tactic when face-to-face with candidates.

Alison Green writes about this question in an article for U.S. News & World Report, mentioning that it is “a cliché at this point” since almost all applicants have a “canned” response.

She adds:

It rarely elicits useful information, and what’s more, a good interviewer will be able to make her own judgments about a candidate’s weakness. It’s hardly helpful to hear “I work too much,” “I’m a perfectionist,” or the other disingenuous responses candidates are taught to give.

Off-limits: illegal interview questions

Keep in mind that just because you can technically ask someone something, it doesn’t necessarily mean you should.

It’s worth pointing out that it’s reportedly illegal to ask applicants certain questions — including ones about religious holidays — during an interview.

Asking about salary history has also made headlines recently. Employers in New York are losing their ability to ask candidates about their salary history with a law that goes into effect this October, and more than 20 states are deliberating enacting similar legislation, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Try these tips instead

Instead, here are some tips on asking effective questions during interviews, according to the Harvard Business Review.

The article suggests steering clear of questions that are “easy-to-practice,” citing the classic examples of “what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?” and “what’s your dream job?” alongside other queries.

It also says to see how well candidates can “solve a problem,” and to “avoid duplication” by not picking questions about things that were detailed in a phone interview or their resume.


BRIGHTSTAR CARE - SARASOTA
CNA
Private Duty
brightstarcare.com
April, 2018


PINES OF SARASOTA - SARASOTA
CNA
Full-Time, Part-Time & Weekends
pinesofsarasota.org
April, 2018


Allegiance Home Care Services is now hiring LPNs, CNAs, and HHAs to service the following areas                     Bradenton, Sarasota, Venice, North Port, and Pt Charlotte for in home private duty as well as staffing in facilities
Please call 941-524-7716
Michelle Cassidy
Care Coordinator

Allegiance Care Services of West Florida
1001 North Washington Blvd Ste 208
Sarasota, Florida  34236
941.524.7716

Families Entrusting Their Loved Ones Since 1999

www.allegiancehcs.com

April, 2018


IDALEN HOME CARE SERVICES - SARASOTA
Caregiver, HHA, CNA
Full-Time
idalenhomecare.com

April, 20418


SARASOTA POINT REHAB CENTER - SARASOTA
CNA
Hiring all shifts
2600 Courtland St., Sarasota, FL

April, 2018

A Company with Heart

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10 RIDICULOUSLY SMART QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK IN A JOB INTERVIEW



In a crowded job market, the last thing you want to be is forgettable.

Yet people do it every day with this one mistake: not asking any questions in a job interview. 

The mistake is understandable. You’ve been so busy preparing to answer questions, that you’re forgetting to show the curiosity that lets interviewers see what you really want to know. After all, even if every single one of your responses are flawless and on point, by not asking a question or two of your interviewer you run the risk of coming across as generic. 

On the other hand, you don’t want to ask terrible questions. That’s even worse.

Here’s how to show the person interviewing you how you’re different and why you stand apart from the rest. 

Why did you join the company?

Mark Phillips, who runs a top office for Sanford Rose Associates, one of the largest recruiting networks in the U.S. had a simple question that could be quite complicated. If the interviewer tells you it was because of vacation days or benefits, chances are good that there isn’t all that much below the surface. If, however, they tell you about the creativity or integrity of the brand, you know you’re potentially going to work for a winner.

How does this role further your company’s mission? 

Kelly Lavin, chief talent officer for newly launched Canvas, the first text-based interviewing platform suggests you ask this because “While job duties and company culture are important to understand, determining why a company and role exists is just as, if not more, important.” It will also allow you to better understand if you “align with the company’s mission and will feel a sense of purpose in your new role.”

Tell me about your most successful employees.  What do they do differently?

Believe it or not, this one is almost a trick question for potential employers Lavin says. “The answer to this question will help a candidate understand how a company defines success and what specific behaviors can lead to that success.” In one fell swoop you’ll find out what success means to this company and how you can better achieve it.  

What do you expect someone in this position to accomplish in the first 60-90 days?
University of Richmond Career Advisor Anna Young says, “Great candidates hit the ground running, find out how you will be expected to jump in and start contributing to the organization from day one.” And in case you’re wondering, it’s fine to modify the question for an internship and ask about expectations for the first few weeks.

What, if anything, in my background gives you pause?

Roberta Matuson, President of Matuson Consulting, says this is pretty much the one must ask question job seekers should ask in an interview. She says “By asking this question, you’ll be able to overcome any objections the interviewer might have before you leave the room.” And if you’re smart, you can find a way to combat any preconceived notions by addressing them in a follow up note.  

What is the turnover in your company, in the executive suite and in the department, I am interviewing for?

Dave Arnold President at Arnold Partners says as a leading independent CFO search consultant for technology companies, he’s had 100’s of people go out to interview with clients, and he thinks that’s a question worth asking. While people no longer expect to stay at any given job for decades or more, it’s nice to know how long you can expect to stick around if given the opportunity. If the interviewer grows uncomfortable or shares the fact that turnaround at their company is higher than Dancing with the Stars, you might want to think twice before accepting the position.   

What are the opportunities for growth and advancement?

Young says, “This can help you to understand the structure of the organization and if there are opportunities to move up and advance your career.” It’s also a great way of finding out about different ways to progress or move into different roles “Also, it could help you to learn if they offered continued training or professional development for employees.”

If you had a chance to interview for your company again (knowing what you know now), what questions would you ask next time?  

Ashley White, executive director for Human Resources for APQC, a member-based non-profit that produces benchmarking and best practice research suggested this toughie.

This one is slightly sneaky because it also allows you to surreptitiously monitor the interviewer’s hidden signals. Do they suddenly look uncomfortable before spouting the company line? Do they greet this with a giant grin? You might have more answers to this question by what they don’t say, than even by what they do share.

What haven’t I asked that most candidates ask?

Phillips also suggested asking this question, which sets you apart immediately. On the one hand, you’re lumping all the other applicants together and showing a level of confidence; on the other hand, you’re gaining insight into your potential competitors: they asked this, but it never even occurred to me.

One last thing: so that you don’t spend the coming days or weeks on pins and needles, it’s always a good idea to ask this next question. 

What are the next steps in this process?

Young says, “If they haven’t already shared this information, it’s important to ask about their timeline so you’re aware of when you could be notified of a second interview, or a potential offer.”

What to ask yourself...

Shannon Breuer, President at Wiley Group was once one of 800 laid off at her former job, Shannon now draws on her own personal experience to provide clients with career coaching and transition services. She offers a list of questions you should ask yourself before an interview, and if needed – you can flip them and ask the interviewer.

  • What level of work-life balance do you wish to enjoy? 
  • How casual do you like to dress? 
  • Is your ideal employer an up-and-coming small business, or a century-old corporation with time-tested values and a clear path for future promotions? 
  • Do you like the management style of the leadership team? 
  • What are the company initiatives you can stand behind?


ALLIED PRO-HEALTH - SARASOTA
CNA's/Companions
941-926-2242
alliedpro-healthcare.com

April, 2018

(941) 685-6871

Florida CNA Skills Center

There are hundreds of jobs for CNA's, Resident Aides, HHA's, Caregivers and Companions in the Gulf Coast area. Job openings are available with no experience at Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Facilities and Home Health Agencies. All you need is our training and you can work immediately as a HHA until you take the Florida State CNA exam and get licensed.

HCR MANOR CARE - SARASOTA

CNA

jobs.hcr-manorcare.com

April, 2018

GRISWOLD HOME CARE - SARASOTA

CNA/HHA

Live-In & Hourly

Full-Time

griswoldhomecare.com

April, 2018


FAMILY FIRST HOMECARE - SARASOTA
HHA's/CNA's
Days/Nights
myfamilyfirsthc.com

April, 2018

DOCTORS HOSPITAL - SARASOTA

CNA

Med/Surg

Full-Time Days

doctorsofsarasota.com

April, 2018

ALL STAT HOME HEALTH - SARASOTA

HHA/CNA

Locally owned and operated

941-764-0880

April, 2018



COASTAL CARE IS HIRING!!!!


Join the Coastal Family today by applying online!
AN HR Representative will contact you within 24 business hours.
Requirements:
Clear Background Screening
Professional License or Certificate
HIV CEU
CPR Card (AHA Approved)
Recent Statement of Good Health (including PPD)
Valid Drivers License
Car Insurance
Car Registration
Social Security Card
FREE CPR CLASS
Do you need your CPR renewed?
Coastal Care is offering FREE CPR for new associates!
Ask an HR Representative for more information.
apply.comeworkfornurses.com

April, 2018

Want more job postings? Click on the Facebook button to the right for more opportunities on our Facebook page.


MAGNOLIA HEALTH & REHAB - SARASOTA
CNA - Rehab - LTC
New Grads Welcome
1507 S. Tuttle Ave.
Sarasota, Fl 34239
April, 2018

BLAKE MEDICAL CENTER - BRADENTON

CNA

Burn/Plastic/Reconstructive

Full-Time

blakemedicalcenter.com

April, 2018



NEUROINTERNATIONAL - SARASOTA
Caregivers who have training in working with individuals with Autism. If interested, please apply in person.
1876 Barber Rd., building A, Sarasota, Fl

April, 2018